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Siblings

2019, acrylic paint, silver, PVC, stainless steel, 1.77" x 3.35" x 4.80"

Yajie Hu

Yajie Hu is a jewellery artist from China and currently based in Florence, Italy. She completed her undergraduate study in the major of Art and Design at Anhui Normal University in China, and then achieved her master’s degree in Jewellery Design at Birmingham City University in the UK. Her works have been exhibited internationally including Europe and the United States. She was one of the three winners of the Preziosa Young Design Competition 2019 in Florence and one of the winners of Porto Joia Award at Collectiva 2019 in Porto Portugal. Her works have also been presented in TALENTE 2018 during the Munich Jewellery Week.

"As an artist, I am naturally attracted to colour and texture, as well as art as a tangible, wearable object. I investigate the colours, textures and shapes of some interesting objects in nature, such as animals and plants. I also study the attractiveness of striking colour combinations that are found in the natural world. These interests have inspired me to create my jewellery collections. I primarily work with acrylic paint as my ideas are best expressed through it. Working with acrylic paint allows me to be in direct contact with colour. I therefore not only investigate its visual qualities but also explore it as a useable material. At the same time, my designs are based on organic forms, which are then transformed and designed into my own aesthetic pieces. I aim for my designs to be worn on the body, but also to be valued as art objects."

yajiehu.com
@yajiehujewellery


Unmeasurable

2019, cooper, wood, stainless steel, silver plating, leather, acrylic, stainless steel, 7 x 7 x 16 cm/24 x 4 x 19 cm/6.3 x 10 x 19 cm/10 x 10 x 13cm/17 x 4.5 x 2 cm

Tingting Chen

Tingting Chen is a designer & maker, contemporary jeweler, partner of SIQIU HANDMADE LTD UK. She holds an MFA in Sheffield Hallam University in jewellery and metalwork, and a BA in École supérieure d'art et de design Marseille-Méditerranée. Tingting got Transform together Scholarships of Sheffield Hallam University in 2019. Her work has recently been published in Great Northern Contemporary Craft Fair Online, and there will be published in Romanian Jewelry Week, AUTOR International Contemporary Jewellery Fair, etc.
Chen uses contemporary jewellery&metalwork to explore the marriage life of contemporary couples and the relationships among couples and their respective families in the marriage life. At the same time, Chen is also exploring the relationships among contemporary objects, stories, the body, and surroundings.

“Love is unmeasurable.
We need to face the fact that one day we will leave our parents and marry someone to create a family. As human beings, we instinctively want to form partnerships with loved ones.
The current state of economic stress affects intimacy. Zelizer (2009) states that people spend huge energy and a constant worry to find the right match between economic relationship and intimacy: joint responsibility for housework, expenditure on family income, care for children and the elderly, presentation of the right message, gift preparation for loved ones, and etc. Love is unmeasurable.
I use contemporary jewellery&metalwork to explore the marriage life of contemporary couples and the relationships among couples and their respective families in the marriage life. At the same time, I am also exploring the relationships among contemporary objects, stories, the body, and surroundings.”

tingtingchen.co.uk
@tingtingchen.design

Separately together

2019, leather, wood, steel, 10 x 10 x 1.2 cm/30 x 30 x 1.2 cm

Tingting Chen

Tingting Chen is a designer & maker, contemporary jeweler, partner of SIQIU HANDMADE LTD UK. She holds an MFA in Sheffield Hallam University in jewellery and metalwork, and a BA in École supérieure d'art et de design Marseille-Méditerranée. Tingting got Transform together Scholarships of Sheffield Hallam University in 2019. Her work has recently been published in Great Northern Contemporary Craft Fair Online, and there will be published in Romanian Jewelry Week, AUTOR International Contemporary Jewellery Fair, etc.
Chen uses contemporary jewellery&metalwork to explore the marriage life of contemporary couples and the relationships among couples and their respective families in the marriage life. At the same time, Chen is also exploring the relationships among contemporary objects, stories, the body, and surroundings.

“Love is unmeasurable.
We need to face the fact that one day we will leave our parents and marry someone to create a family. As human beings, we instinctively want to form partnerships with loved ones.
The current state of economic stress affects intimacy. Zelizer (2009) states that people spend huge energy and a constant worry to find the right match between economic relationship and intimacy: joint responsibility for housework, expenditure on family income, care for children and the elderly, presentation of the right message, gift preparation for loved ones, and etc. Love is unmeasurable.
I use contemporary jewellery&metalwork to explore the marriage life of contemporary couples and the relationships among couples and their respective families in the marriage life. At the same time, I am also exploring the relationships among contemporary objects, stories, the body, and surroundings.”

tingtingchen.co.uk
@tingtingchen.design

Photo Credit: Billy

Transformation

2014, plastic, thread, 5 x 4.5 x 4 cm

Mengnan Zi

I graduated from the china university of geosciences great wall college in 2013 and I furthered my degree in Birmingham City University. I have been engaged in design service since 2015, teaching jewelry design in Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing City University and Yanching Institute of Technology. Now I am a teacher at Sichuan Fine Arts Institute. I gained a second prize in Beauty of Inheritance design competition, which holds by Beijing Institute of Culture and Art. And I have taken part in many exhibitions at home and abroad.

"In my work, I explore the process of the transformation of the ordinary to the extraordinary though the process of embellishment, elevating the status of PVC plastic. PVC is used as it is a softer and more malleable plastic and is also relatively inexpensive. Three dimensional shapes provide different perspectives from various angles as well as allowing for different layers when decorated by embroidery, its life is extended and its value elevated. The embroidery used is steeped in historical craft and requires much time and care in its handmade production. This adds value to the plastic material reinventing it as something to be cared for and valued.
My patterns consist of abstract lines which express dynamic and static states creating directional force. The colours used in the collection are derived from nature. Some of the colours I used are so extraordinary that at first you would not realise they exist within our natural world and surroundings."


Photo Credit: Billy

Transformation

2014, plastic, thread, 6 x 4.5 x 4 cm

Mengnan Zi

I graduated from the china university of geosciences great wall college in 2013 and I furthered my degree in Birmingham City University. I have been engaged in design service since 2015, teaching jewelry design in Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing City University and Yanching Institute of Technology. Now I am a teacher at Sichuan Fine Arts Institute. I gained a second prize in Beauty of Inheritance design competition, which holds by Beijing Institute of Culture and Art. And I have taken part in many exhibitions at home and abroad.

"In my work, I explore the process of the transformation of the ordinary to the extraordinary though the process of embellishment, elevating the status of PVC plastic. PVC is used as it is a softer and more malleable plastic and is also relatively inexpensive. Three dimensional shapes provide different perspectives from various angles as well as allowing for different layers when decorated by embroidery, its life is extended and its value elevated. The embroidery used is steeped in historical craft and requires much time and care in its handmade production. This adds value to the plastic material reinventing it as something to be cared for and valued.
My patterns consist of abstract lines which express dynamic and static states creating directional force. The colours used in the collection are derived from nature. Some of the colours I used are so extraordinary that at first you would not realise they exist within our natural world and surroundings."



ear-hook

2020, silver 925, PC mirror, 6" x 4" x 4.7"

Guangyi Ding

I have studied jewelry for three years, during which time I have been exploring new processes and materials. I am glad to use materials such as magnets and circuits to combine with traditional precious metals, to add to my design, and to explore the possibility of wearing jewelry.

"My work simulates jewelry through light and mirror, replaces traditional materials with contemporary materials, replaces materials with immaterial, and puts forward a new exploration of value. I think this is a challenge to the traditional jewelry value rules, which is consistent with the purpose of the exhibition."



necklace

2020, silver 925, PC mirror, 5.5" x 12.5" x 12.5"

Guangyi Ding

I have studied jewelry for three years, during which time I have been exploring new processes and materials. I am glad to use materials such as magnets and circuits to combine with traditional precious metals, to add to my design, and to explore the possibility of wearing jewelry.

"My work simulates jewelry through light and mirror, replaces traditional materials with contemporary materials, replaces materials with immaterial, and puts forward a new exploration of value. I think this is a challenge to the traditional jewelry value rules, which is consistent with the purpose of the exhibition."



earring

2020, silver 925, PC mirror, 4.3" x 1" x 0.6"

Guangyi Ding

I have studied jewelry for three years, during which time I have been exploring new processes and materials. I am glad to use materials such as magnets and circuits to combine with traditional precious metals, to add to my design, and to explore the possibility of wearing jewelry.

"My work simulates jewelry through light and mirror, replaces traditional materials with contemporary materials, replaces materials with immaterial, and puts forward a new exploration of value. I think this is a challenge to the traditional jewelry value rules, which is consistent with the purpose of the exhibition."





Lost at Sea Mariner Chain

2019, sterling silver , 1/4" x 1/2" x 8 1/8"

Maynard Mann

Maynard Mann, born 1995 in Baltimore, Maryland, is currently a senior at Savannah College of Art and Design studying jewelry. Having grown up in a complicated environment, his work explores the intersection of trauma and identity in the form of adornment. For him, a moment lived away from the bench is a moment wasted. He aspires to one day build this passion into a career as an independently owned jeweler.

"In terms of what I value most when producing my work, accessibility is extremely important to me. I want to make things that your average person can afford, but also something that they will cherish greatly. I have as little interest in producing one of a kind pieces costing thousands of dollars as I do in sending files off to be readymade and shipped out without ever having to personally sit at a bench myself, Which is to say, none at all.
Producing work that lives up to the standards of fine jewelry while remaining in the price range of production jewelry is a feat easier said than done. I believe that modern production and reproduction techniques such as 3d printing are changing that fact, allowing small jewelers such as myself to produce an abundance of work in-house without the need for additional staff or outsourcing. I believe my ability to implement this new kind of workflow in order to produce intricately detailed work without sacrificing quality in the name of quality is what separates me from my peers."

behance.net/maynardmann
@the_promethian_jeweler


Interdependence II

2020, muslin, copper, cotton thread, nylon thread, headpin, 42" x 31"

Diya Wang

My name is Diya Wang, I am an artist, jeweler and designer. I was born in central China. I received my Bachelor of Art degree in Fashion Design at Wuhan International Trade University from China in 2011. In 2018, I received my Bachelor of Fine Art in Jewelry and Metalsmithing at University of Oregon in Eugene, and I am presently pursuing my Master of Fine Art in Jewelry and Metalsmithing at Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) in Providence.

"As a jeweler, I always curious about the limitations of wearability. I explore about how to convert traditional jewelry format into unconventional format. My practice also investigates about how jewelry as social representation that shifts people’s identity in society. My work usually incorporates my previous experience in fashion design through processes or the way of photo documentation into my own artistic practice in jewelry and metalsmithing. My recent investigation began with Fashion Draping. I used fashion draping techniques to drape most basic bodices with abstract 'jewelry'. Through the processes of folding and pining fabrics together, they present the concept that jewelry and garment complement to each other when both are worn on the body. People choose to wear cloth and jewelry as decorative perspective, but it also could be the shift represents the identities of the wearer.”

diya-wang.com


Linked

2019, copper, enamel, steel, acrylic paint, 4" x 2 3/4" x 1 1/4" each

Jamie Kroeger

Jamie Kroeger is a farm kid turned mountain girl who relies on wilderness, science and culture for ideas and motivation. By means of making, she translates the relationship between people and environment into object-based narratives, using an integration of material, process and concept to further portray a narrative. Based in Golden, British Columbia, she has worked with National Parks, highway avalanche control and as a backcountry ski guide. The majority of her adult life has been spent outside. Through art jewellery, she illustrates these experiences and explores the social and ecological connections that occur between humans and the outdoors.

"Science and economics have traditionally been used to delineate the relationship between living and non-living components of an ecosystem. Merit is calculated by data, but never really considers the equally valuable aspects of observation, storytelling and emotional connection. My jewellery, by means of concept, process and material, ironically is an exploration into connecting people to the natural world, through object. The work has the potential to question and expose the narrative of cultural and individual value that pertains to the environments of today that we choose, or inherently exist within.
Within this work, fragility and value are emphasized by material choice (enamel, steel), whereas time is observed through process (carving). Change becomes relevant with the addition of fire, quickly altering the surface and the context. These choices lend a specific sentimentality to the everyday, normal object. Safety gear, firewood and tools become the jewellery of this culture. It may be far from comfortable, it may ruffle the feathers of the old cowboys and it may dirty up your shirt. However, these actions, intentional or not, tell a story of a wilderness life: one reliant on innovation, problem solving and a little bit of superstition."

jamiekroeger.com
@oldsoulrevolution


Mundane Ritual

2020, copper, powder coat, pig intestines, pills, steel, 4.5” x 1.25” x 1.5” 

Shaunia Grant

Shaunia Grant was born and raised in Las Cruces, New Mexico. She is an object maker, expressing her own struggles with body image and chronic illness through jewelry and installation. As a teenager, Shaunia was diagnosed with a common chronic illness Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. The symptoms include hormone imbalances, weight gain, depression, and commonly infertility. Through using a variety of medications and organic materials, she creates wearable works that call attention to the mundane yet complicated relationship that those with chronic illness have with their medical treatment. Her identity as a queer woman of color has informed her perspective as she tackles the subversive nature of living in a sometimes burdensome body.

“Women's medicine is not taken very seriously. It required multiple doctors for me to get a diagnosis. Making Jewelry that focuses on Chronically ill bodies as a female artist with these struggles helps highlight the ever growing burden the medical system has on women, especially women of color.
Material choices are critical to the communication of meaning in my work. I use pig intestines as a proxy for the human body filling wet intestines with pills, allowing them to degrade and stain the flesh. The bright color distracts from the grotesque nature of the implied digestion, while metaphorically commenting on how medication can change the body. The pills are contrasted with the sterile appearance of the metal constructed jewelry representing the idealistic nature of the pharmacies and doctors offices that the medication is prescribed in.
Using alternative materials is something that the metalsmithing community has been moving more and more towards as it progresses. This is very important to me. Heightening mundane material because it’s social and societal implications are more important than the material cost is something I truly find satisfying as an artist. While my work has its place with traditional jewelry using techniques and calling on references, it’s interest lies in what it changes about it.”


@unloadedmindset

Woven Bar Necklace

2015, copper, sterling silver, iron, enamel, 1" x 5 1/2" x 3/4" chain 21"

Jennifer Wells

Jennifer Wells, MFA, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina. She has completed artist-in- residencies at: Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, TN, Pocosin Arts in Columbia, NC and the Jentel Foundation near Banner, WY and has worked for several U.S based Craft Schools, in a variety of roles.
As an educator, Jennifer has taught for and been a visiting Artist at Universities throughout the U.S and for study abroad programs based in Italy. Currently she serves on the Board of Vita Institute and teaches short workshops on various enameling and metalsmithing techniques throughout Europe and the U.S. In recent years she has curated multiple international exhibitions focused on jewelry and enameling.
Her work is in the collections of the Enamel Arts Foundation, the Racine Museum and Private Collections.

"I have chosen iron wire as a way to explore expressing form and movement through the value of lines. I work with the wire as though drawing in space, relaying an association to stitches and weavings. Creating three-dimensional forms, patterns, designs, and line segments that when put together become a patchwork of my visual library and life experiences.
For my collection of jewelry pieces, I coat the iron wire in enamel. This allows for me to incorporate color into the pieces and at the same time, give the wire rigidness combined with the rich history of enamel. Pairing the enameled iron wire with metal sheet fabrication permits me to further explore line and form within the piece. Through the play of positive, negative and implied lines, I am able to capture glimpses of moments to which anyone may relate."

jennwells.com
@jennwellsstudio

Concertina Necklace

2019, walnut, porcelain, 8" x 10" x 2"

Griffith Evans

My current body of work consists of wood jewelry with hand built porcelain accents. Inspired by African jewelry and curvilinear wood furniture, I produce limited production personal adornment of singular form. I harvest declining orchard wood in the northern New Mexico village of Cuartelez. Cutting open a log and seeing the exposed grain for the first time is one of the most exciting parts of the whole process. My mind literally races with possibilities as the inside is revealed. I strive to convey this excitement by crafting carefully finished, simple forms to celebrate the beauty of each piece of wood.


@griffith_evans




Orbiting Ziggurat 1 - brooch

2020, palladium plated brass/bronze, oleographic vinyl, Ø 58 mm, H 37 mm

Paolo Gambarelli

Founded in 2018, Lunante draws a constant lymph from the notions I acquired in architectural knowledge and from my innate propensities and deep love for manual work; the design, the construction and the presentation of these jewels are part of the many expressions of my training. Every jewel shall be considered as a constant translation and semantic reinterpretation of forms and concepts of our everyday life. I use geometry as a metalanguage, sometimes serious, sometimes amused, sometimes intelligent or silly, and it would be nice if every life were like this.

"Inspired by Bruegel’s Tower of Babel painting, these jewels are a look towards the cosmos and its sidereal colors. It is a vision realized through the Ziggurat’s spiral shape that represents the archetypal symbol of communication between Heaven and Earth."

lunante.it
@lunantedesign

Orbiting Ziggurat 3 - necklace

2020, palladium plated brass/bronze, oleographic vinyl, Ø 20 mm, H 130 mm

Paolo Gambarelli

Founded in 2018, Lunante draws a constant lymph from the notions I acquired in architectural knowledge and from my innate propensities and deep love for manual work; the design, the construction and the presentation of these jewels are part of the many expressions of my training. Every jewel shall be considered as a constant translation and semantic reinterpretation of forms and concepts of our everyday life. I use geometry as a metalanguage, sometimes serious, sometimes amused, sometimes intelligent or silly, and it would be nice if every life were like this.

"Inspired by Bruegel’s Tower of Babel painting, these jewels are a look towards the cosmos and its sidereal colors. It is a vision realized through the Ziggurat’s spiral shape that represents the archetypal symbol of communication between Heaven and Earth."

lunante.it
@lunantedesign


felt cute, might delete later, idk...

2020, plastic, hands, vinyl, utility rope, acrylic, brass, hair rollers, 36" x 12"

Gretchen Schreiber

Gretchen Schreiber is an MFA candidate in Metalwork, Jewelry Design and Digital Fabrication at Northern Illinois University, and is also pursuing a second Master’s degree in Art Education. She received her BFA in Metals at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. Gretchen is currently pursuing a series of body dependent sculptures and wearables focused on the performativity of self in the digital realm.

"My work rejects established concepts of jewelry by forgoing traditional metalsmithing materials such as precious metals and gemstones. I instead apply traditional metalsmithing techniques to alternative materials such as fabric, plastic, and found objects. The objects and materials that I incorporate into wearables are chosen for their inherent connotations, thus existing as symbolic elements. I use the body as a vehicle for research-based art and unpack ideas relating to performativity of self on social media and other digital realms."

gretchenschreiber.com
@gretchen_schreiber

Photo Credit: Paul Ambtman

Anodized Body Form Earrings

2020, sterling silver, anodized niobium, 2.2" x 0.1" x 0.5"

Negin Tadayyon

Negin Tadayyon found out about her passion for jewellery when she ordered a simple earring for herself. She then followed her dream by taking gold smithing classes at Talafonoun Institute in Iran. Also, she had a few groups and solo exhibitions and charity events. In 2014, she started her own business and opened a gold galley. Later on, she expanded her business to three stores. She immigrated to Canada in 2016 and decided to improve her knowledge of jewellery while working in sales at jewellery departments. Negin started the Jewellery Arts program at George Brown College along with the Graduate Gemologist program at the Gemological Institute of America in distance education. In her years at George Brown, she found her aesthetic to create organic pieces that have details. While educating herself, she also works as a volunteer in the industry. She is currently based in Toronto as a jewellery maker and designer. Negin does one-of-a-kind pieces as well as production and she always keeps her soft, organic detailed aesthetic.

"I celebrate the aesthetic appeal in the design and creativity of the jewellery. The narrative and the sentimental value behind every piece gives us sight into wearer personality. I strive to make one of a kind jewellery with a story behind it. There is always something appealing about soft and organic shapes that calms me. I am also very passionate about gemstones and the path each one takes through the process of making. Each inclusion that has a story behind it and makes that gem unique, special and real. Usually asymmetrical, natural motifs combined with colours are my way of expressing my designs. I like the element of surprise and using details in my pieces. I like that hidden texture or the stone on the side of the ring. I would design the back of my pendants and pay attention to the beauty of the pins on my brooches. I get my ideas from things surrounding me. Observing butterflies on my everyday walk, a female ballerina dancing, a dream in my head can be an inspiration to me to create."


@negin.tad


High Beams

2020, plastic, fiber objects, 19" x 8" x 2"

Katie Kameen

Katie Kameen creates jewelry by playfully experimenting with premade plastic objects. Kameen received her BFA in 3D Studio from Eastern Illinois University in Charleston, Illinois, and her MFA in Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. She exhibits nationally and internationally at venues including Site: Brooklyn Gallery in Brooklyn, New York, Kunstnerforbundet Gallery in Oslo, Norway and Galerie Marzee in Nijmegen, Netherlands. Kameen was awarded the Ethical Metalsmiths Student Committee Emerging Artist Award in 2017. Her work has been published in American Craft Magazine, Friend of the Artist, and Uppercase Magazine.

"In my work I combine colorful mid-century and contemporary plastics to create adornment that examines how everyday materials can provide a space for self-expression. Jewelry represents an opportunity to showcase what we value and I use that to highlight materials not traditionally considered precious. I use playful forms and colors to elevate everyday objects that have outlived their original functions, but not their aesthetic potential. The recognizable forms and individual components in my work evoke a shared haptic experience, relating both to memory and the immediate objects that surround us. Functional plastic objects, with their bright colors, glossy surfaces, and slick industrial designs, have a strong formal identity. Throughout my work, these identities are alternatingly heightened and erased. By deforming and recomposing plastics, I discover paths to self-portraiture while expressing an awareness towards this now abundant material and revealing the meaningful relationship between objects and the entanglements of material and memory."

katiekameen.com
@katiekameen


#followme #followmeback

2018, copper, chrome, powder coat, steel, 4" x 3" x 0.5" times 2

Victor Beckmann

Victor Beckmann is an MFA graduate from New Mexico State University. He received his BFA from the University of Texas at El Paso where he studied Metalsmithing and Graphic Design. Victor’s work utilizes a multitude of mediums while his approach is typically related to the body. His current work explores contemporary digital trends and the way they affect our physical experience as well as the way we transact the self.

"Over the last half century our society has experienced the rapid acceleration of technological advancements that have fundamentally transformed the very fabric of our social and intellectual landscapes. We can instantly form thousands of connections across hundreds of platforms, without borders or bodies. My work investigates social media as one of the more recent developments in this larger trajectory that stands as the crowning achievement of the information age. My work primarily explores the creation of the digital identities that arise within the spheres of social media. The work is critical of the failings of these digital platforms as a means to create self-identity in order to question the systems to which an audience of native users and adaptors are accustomed to.
As we populate our profiles we then see ourselves through the screen creating a cognitive dissonance between what is and what is curated. In the work I explore the fragmentary nature of these identities and their paradoxical inability to reconcile with the physical being that they come to represent. I want to show the inextricable relationship between the self and the selfie, and the hashtag and the tagged. A virtual identity does not always reflect the reality of things when mutually exclusive users are forced to confront this asymmetry. In these instances, we are reminded that the personas we portray are not and cannot be, our reality."

vmbeckmann.com
@vmbeckmann


Synth Rock Brooch

2020, vinyl, silver, glass beads, vinyl beads, thread, 3.25" x 3.25"

Laurel Nathanson

I picked up a torch 35 years ago, at the age of 15, and that sealed my destiny. After attending art school for college where I studied jewelry/metal arts, I then went to a graduate program in the field. I have taught workshops at jewelry conferences across the country and have written many articles for jewelry magazines. I live in Oakland, California with my two pups, Bonnie and Bailey.

"I find myself in a precarious position these days, stuck somewhere between emerging and mid career artist. After many many years of teaching jewelry/metal arts, and working on more conventional jewelry lines, I have finally decided to make the crazy, non traditional, exploratory work that totally excites and inspires me. Entering the field of art jewelry feels like home. I love to push boundaries with materials, techniques and concepts, and to be able to create objects that confront our preconceived notions of jewelry while still maintaining the discipline of this craft."

laurelnathanson.com
@laurelnathanson




Three Cocoons

2020, sterling silver round wire, cocoon, thread, voile, 46 x 33.5 x 29 mm

Angela Lu

Mingying Lu is a jeweler who was born in Shenzhen, and studies at Pratt Institute, in Brooklyn, New York. Mingying balances her year between New York and Shenzhen, China. In New York, she is designing and fabricating a unique collection of wearable contemporary art jewelry; while in Shenzhen, China, she teaches jewelry design and bench work at Xiaoyan School of Art. Mingying is inspired by the delicate and intricate details of larger objects along with texture, pattern, and natural forms. She creatively combines various natural fibers with metal and intricate mechanics to create unique, elegant wearable art forms.

"'It is always easier to draw a tiger than its bones.’ ‘画人画虎难画骨.’
Beginning with this old Chinese saying, I designed and developed my series of contemporary art jewelry.
In this collection, I explore the complexity hidden in simplicity; inspired by elaborate patterns and structure concealed inside minimalist forms. My work encourages the wearer to question simplicity and asks them to investigate the anatomy within. The wearer is privy to something hidden and unexpected within each piece and each interaction uncovers something deeper.
The most intuitive way to stimulate someone’s curiosity is through the sense of touch, and I use this notion to support my use of texture and fiber. The Silk cocoon is the predominant material in my collection, and the primary source of my inspiration.cocoons are the skin that hides the moth within. In my work the viewer sees the ‘tiger’, but the wearer discovers the ‘bones’ within."


@mingying_lllu

EXISTENCE I (Brooch)

2018, SLS nylon, gold leaf, mylar, window film, acrylic, plated 18k gold, 3" x 2" x 1/2"

Chang Bao

Chang Bao is an Independent Contemporary Jewelry Maker based in the San Francisco Bay Area. She was born in Beijing. She studied education in Hong Kong before coming to the U.S. to pursue her dream of becoming an artist. She graduated from the metals program at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Her work utilizes both digital technologies and traditional fabrication craftsmanship. She uses her artworks as a metaphor to shed light on social relations and encourage people to think about themselves and the world around them. Her works have been featured in books and magazines, such as the Jewelry and Metal Survey published by the Society of North American Goldsmiths and the book Chinese Contemporary Jewelry. Her works have been exhibited in multiple cities in the U.S. and in China.

“‘We always find something, eh Didi, to give us the impression we exist?’, Gogo asked Didi. ‘Yes, yes, we're magicians.’ Didi replied.
My work was inspired by the existentialist play Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett. In the show, two men, Vladimir (Didi) and Estragon (Gogo) are waiting for a third person, Godot, to arrive, but Godot never came. The show questions the reason for human existence on the earth and suggests that life itself has no meaning and full of suffering. Meanwhile, another existentialism writer Jean-Paul Sartre wrote in his book Nausea, ‘...life begins on the other side of despair.’ My interpretation is that everyone in the world is searching for their own meaning of life, and to understand the meaning of life and to live it properly one has to go through a transformation – he has to experience disappointment, confusion, and even despair. It requires great energy and enthusiasm to construct one’s own meaning of life. The ability to do so is what makes our experience of living in the world so meaningful and glorious.”

chang-bao.com
@chang_msseal




Photo Credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Downstate

2018, sterling silver, 7" x 7" x 7", 73" wire

Sylvie Lissa Alusitz

Sylvie Lissa Alusitz is a metalsmith and jeweler based in New York. She received her MFA from the State University of New York at New Paltz in Metal in 2019 and a BFA in Jewelry and Metalsmthing from Rochester Institute of Technology in 2015. Sylvie has exhibited nationally and internationally, including Autor Contemporary Jewelry Fair, Bucharest, Romania; Gallery 2052, Chicago, Illinois; and others. She is currently an Artist-in-Residence at Harbourfront Centre in Toronto, Canada. Her work explores the relationships we have to people and place. Explored through textile and basketry techniques executed in metal, she creates representations of things untouchable.

"Baskets have the ability to transcend time, mark birth, death and regrowth. The home serves to protect our daydreams, compilations of memory and imagination. The emotions that populate our daydreams are poems that were once lost. Through basketry and textiles processes, forms naturally arise that become a physical representation of something untouchable, and give language to these emotions. Lines of metal weave in and out, over and under, twist and turn. I twine and coil with wire, and weave with thin strips. Experimentation with processes not typically executed in metal leads to new and unexpected outcomes. Left open, my work allows itself to be entered by different people, to move through time and place and inhabit multiple spaces at once. Pieces occupy a space somewhere between wearable and non-wearable, being both yet neither at the same time. The physical act of creating is a way for me to process these experiences, emotions, and thoughts, allowing me to finally assign language to fleeting recollections. Often repetitive, tedious, and time consuming, my work requires extensive material preparation before it takes shape. The time spent on material preparation expresses a reverence for the final product and the intimacy of space."

sylvielissaalusitz.com
@sylvielissa



La Mirada del Alma (The Soul's Gaze)

2017, stainless steel shot, sterling silver, 3.75” x 2.75” x 0.125”

Ale Carrillo-Estrada

Alejandra Carrillo-Estrada is an interdisciplinary artist who grew up on the U.S.-Mexico border in El Paso, Texas. In 2018, she received an MFA from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and in 2009, a BFA from the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), graduating cum laude. She has participated in internships, residencies, and workshops throughout the country and has exhibited nationally and internationally. Living back in the border has reinforced her commitment to create art that addresses issues of racial and social justice. Currently, she is a professor at her alma mater, UTEP, where she teaches design and metals jewelry.

“I explore themes related to identity, border culture, and social justice. Conceptually, I focus on liminality in both geographical and symbolical contexts. My theoretical framework uses the idea of ‘in-between-ness,’ which literary scholar Gloria E. Anzaldua calls ‘nepantla’, in order to think critically about the U.S-Mexico borderlands. My main subject is the U.S.-Mexico border and my main focus is personal and cultural belonging. Other topics I research are immigration, labor and the body. I aim to dismantle stereotypes and create materials for emergent cultural identities. I am engaged in the complex relationship in my practice as both the bodily act of fabrication and the artisanal knowledge as a contemporary artisan.”

akiceri.com
@ale_akiceri

Bubble 2

2020, PVC, copper, sterling silver, powder coat, 3" x 0.25" x 3"

Eunji Shin

Eunji Shin is a Korean artist. She completed her Major in Jewellery and Metalsmithing in 2020 at Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University, Halifax, in Canada. Her inspiration comes from her several different cultural experiences growing up in Korea, spending her transitional high school years in the Philippines, and studying Jewellery and Metalsmithing in Canada. This experience inspired a development in Shin’s jewellry design. Her work has been shown in several exhibitions in Canada and USA, including 19th Silver Triennial 2019, Germany.

“I enjoy experimenting with alternative materials and colors. My previous project, ‘Oil and Water’, is a series of resin work, inspired by a common phenomenon that oil does not mix with water. This phenomenon visually and conceptually prompted me to create a unique series of new works investigating the experience of being a foreign student in Canada; and the feeling of not being part of society. Currently, influenced by ‘Oil and Water’, I am working with ‘Iridescence’ which is caused by interference of light. It is often found in a layer of oil on a wet pavement. It displays such a delightful scene that its colors seem to change depending on the angle of view. I am trying to achieve ‘dreamlike’ and ‘color utopia’ by exploring the color and reflection of ‘Iridescence’.”


@eunji_jewellery







In Utero

2020, polyester & rayon threads, plastic straws, acrylics, nylon mesh, stainless steel, 5.1" x 4.3" x 1.3"

Nadejda Policarpova

Nadia is an independent textile artist and contemporary jewelry crafter born and currently living in Moldova. Coming from a country with rich cultural and craftsmanship heritage, Nadia has been acquainted with various textile techniques from an early age.
Pursuing a BA in Fashion Design, Nadia has attended National University of Arts in Iasi, Romania, where Nadia has been further exposed to different textile and other artistic practices. One of Nadia’s professors, who is herself a jewelry maker, introduced Nadia to the magical world of contemporary jewelry, a field where art meets fashion and is less constrained by the functional aspect of the design, thus offering a large terrain for exploration and experiment.
Nadia had to step away from art and design for a while due to personal reasons, but never lost hope to rekindle old flames, so Nadia started exploring traditional craftsmanship and unconventional materials 2 years ago and, slowly, this led to developing a signature style and personal author techniques and the wonderful journey in the realm of contemporary jewelry Nadia embarked on.

“In my work I seek to preserve traditional Romanian textile heritage by reinterpreting it a fresh, unique and personal way. One of the main techniques I developed consists of 'casting’ found ready-made objects in a dense web of delicately handcrafted Romanian point lace cords ‘glued’ together by embroidery stitches, that are later stiffened by adding several other layers of cord, thus playing with depth of texture and color. What I've done is taking a highly decorative laborious traditional craftsmanship from bi-dimensionality to 3D and tempering it with quite minimalist shapes, in this way making it appear contemporary and novel. On a personal level, past several years were about growth and awareness, reparenting myself and facing childhood traumas that were holding me back, so, inevitably, I reconnected with my roots and childhood experiences and that lead to uncovering various toys of interesting shapes (my mother stored for rainy days) that I used as prototypes for my pieces. Being from an early age a lover of multiple second chances and always finding new uses for old things (before sustainability became mainstream), I've decided to bring that approach to my artistic practice, introducing unexpected leftover cheap industrial materials, redefine and elevate them by laborious handcrafted techniques. From multiple experiments, open cell foam and nylon mesh had been successfully integrated in my process and I'm continuing to further develop textures and embroidery methods based on enmeshment of old and new, industrial and handmade, tradition and experiment.
I absolutely love the field of contemporary jewelry for the endless possibility to explore and embrace the chaos, for the freedom of self-expression it offers to both the artist and the wearer, and the opportunity it gives customers to integrate art in their routine experience. I also strongly believe that while being respectful to traditions and customs, and preserving our heritage, we are free to contribute to it by adding own unique vision and infinitely enrich it.”


@vinigret_studio

Visible/Invisible I'm with you

2020, sterling silver, laser etched formica, vintage quilt square, embroidery floss, pearl, 4" x 3.5" x 1"

Angela Caldwell

Angela Caldwell is a fulltime studio artist and is currently studying as an MFA at Indiana University, Bloomington. Her work focuses on memory and examines women’s role in society through traditional craft-based techniques. Upon receiving her recent BFA, she was a nominee for the Windgate Fellowship. Caldwell’s work has been shown nationally in many juried exhibitions, most recently at Arrowmont’s, Geoffrey A Wolpert Gallery, and included in Metalsmith Magazine.

"While my work utilizes traditional craft techniques, but, by incorporating new innovations, using them in unpredictable ways and juxtaposing differing materials together, I am re-imagining these crafts through a modern lens. I seek to reveal something familiar yet pose questions as to arrangement and design. The familiarity is a means to invite the viewer/wearer in and to then discover something new."

angelacaldwelljewellry.com
@angelacaldwelljewelry


Photo Credit: Andrew Kuebeck

The Looming Present

2019, plastic bags, garden hose, zip ties, foam tubes, glass orb, red sand, seeds, 9' x 2.5' x 5.5'

Erica Hoosic

Erica Hoosic is a contemporary metal and material-smith. She has been studying metalsmithing since 2006 as an undergrad at The University of Akron and recently has graduated with her Masters from Kent State University. She is currently living in Akron, OH but her work has been seen far outside the mid-west. Speculative Fiction has been a big inspiration when creating work. When creating she is always imagining how a more continuous, vibrant, and sustainable way of life could be possible. She is deeply invested in the idea of the future being an amalgam of understanding with all matter that exists.

“My work is wearable and exists alongside the human body. By adorning yourself in my work, I wish for the wearer to form a profound connection with flora and fauna and to cultivate empathy for creatures that share this planet. These suits that I am making are for the future but are made with materials from the past. Wearing the waste of the past gives a chance to physically atone for our destructive nature and creates a bond with that which surrounds us.
It’s my understanding that people should always be looking towards the future. Now in our present time while I am creating work, I’ll often ask myself ‘How can I be a good ancestor?’. As a maker I am aware that I am creating objects to exist in an overabundant world of objects. I want the work that I create to activate questions of existence with the natural world. I want my viewers to question their own habits and realize that the place that surrounds us now will vastly be different in the future due to our action or non-action.”


@eurrrca

Bone-In

2019, cuttlebone, copper, 18k gold plate, 2" x 2" x 1"

Brandy Scholl

I am a jeweler, sculptor, and young educator who was born and raised in Greenville, South Carolina. I graduated with a B. F. A. in Studio Art with a concentration in jewelry/metals and sculpture at Winthrop University and I am currently pursuing a Master of Fine Arts with a concentration in jewelry and metalsmithing at Indiana University of Bloomington.

"My current series utilizes cuttlefish bone as a unique material to express my desire for continuity and understanding through contained, tangible forms. I am especially captivated by the cuttlefish bone in relation to its environment. When carved, the unique layers of the soft cuttlebone closely resemble contour line maps of the ocean floor. In essence, the structural formation of the bone is mirroring the larger oceanic environment it lives in. By deconstructing the cuttlefish bone and displaying it within simple shapes - such as ovals, circles, and rectangles - I aim to capture and magnify the beautifully complex details found in cuttlefish anatomy."

brandyscholl.com
@brandy424


Convergence II

2020, concrete, silicon, sterling silver, stainless steel (pin), 1" x 3.5" x 2"

Stina Siqiong Wen

Stina (Siqiong) Wen is graduated from University of Georgia, Lamar Dodd School of Art, in Jewelry and Metalwork, and now as a M.F.A student at the Savannah College of Art and Design in Jewelry. Although she was trained in traditional metalsmith in her undergrad study, she’s obsesses to explore alternative materials and observe everything in her daily life that infuse her creative process.
Stina has recently attended American Craft Show and Philadelphia MoA Contemporary Craft Show. She has studied and traveled around different countries, and her works have been exhibited in United States, China, and Italy. Besides making jewelry, Stina also enjoys teaching and writing articles that pass or spread her artistic and jewelry enthusiastic to more people.

"Jewelry always serves me to explore the inner self. I express visually and tactually through hands to bring forward the mind. My works transmit personal experiences of making ultimately to evoke people’s curiosity and touch instinct, and provoke the way to create a dynamic interaction in between wearer and viewer.
Growing up in an agricultural university within a prosperous urban city of Guangzhou in China has impacted on me to perceive natural and industrial city in a different perspective. Even though these two types of landscapes seem hard to get along with, I never see separation but harmonious integration between them. I enjoy living in this shifting landscape, which also inspires me to explore jewelry as a communicative tool that brings visual and haptic quality through being contrasted with alternative materials.
Concrete is the main material I work in this series with since this is the most common but neglected material we see every day. For me, concrete is not austere and bland but a flexible and shape-able material. I manipulate it in my own way to challenge its softness, tactility, and transparency. Therefore, my concrete not only look soft but also touch soft. The transition of material from coarse to soft also creates a transitional color saturation, which intrigues viewers to see and touch. Life is so hard, but jewelry is something that could bright up our lives."

stinajewelry.com
@stina_jewelry

Landscape Brooch: River

2020, copper, enamel, graphite, linen steel, sterling silver, 6" x 3" x 0.125"

Jessi Sawyer

Jessi Sawyer is a studio jeweler and metalsmith living in the DFW area of Texas. She received her MFA in Metalsmithing and Jewelry from The University of North Texas in May 2019, and recently completed a 9-month artist residency at The Epic in Grand Prairie, TX. She teaches local jewelry and metalsmithing classes and maintains an active studio practice. Jessi creates jewelry, objects, and sculpture in a range of materials including gemstones, silver, gold, steel, and enamel.

"This body of work explores my relationship with landscape and space as place. Using a variety of materials, including enamel, silk and linen steel, silver, and graphite, I revisit memories of places through a lens of understanding that the line between memory, dream, and reality is blurred. I use repetitive processes such as mark-making, weaving, and knitting as a nod to the work of hands and its importance in my life. These processes become a way to add a new layer of meaning to the spaces and places that have become significant to me through experience and memories of those experiences."

jessisawyer.com
@ohcholula


Photo Credit: Shuoyuan Bai

Relax

2019, acrylic, brass, copper, sterling silver, freshwater pearls, enamel paint, vintage fishing lure, 11.4" x 5.1" x 6.4"

Xun Liu

Xun Liu is a jewelry artist and designer. She received her M.F.A. in Jewelry from Savannah College of Art and Design in Savannah, Georgia, and her B.F.A. in Art and Design from Wuhan University in Wuhan, China. Her early studies focused on Public Art, such as sculpture and installation art, which allows her to design and make jewelry from different perspectives. Her work has been shown in different countries, including United States, Spain, Australia, Portugal and China.

"Storytelling and my use of imagination are huge aspects of my work. This collection is driven from vintage fishing lures which I found at various places. I engage in play to create my pieces in sculptural ways. I crafted a story with each fishing lure to create an intimate relationship and bring jewelry to an art form rather than be focused on the idea of conventional wearability. By giving these objects unique voices, they communicate with people beyond their physical form. My artistic process creates jewelry that evokes a sense of playfulness, joy, and imagination."

xunliustudio.com
@xunliu26

Dancing

2018, sterling silver, freshwater pearls, coral, sand dollars, patina on copper, vintage fishing lure, fishing line, stainless steel (pin), 10" x 13.5" x 4.5"

Xun Liu

Xun Liu is a jewelry artist and designer. She received her M.F.A. in Jewelry from Savannah College of Art and Design in Savannah, Georgia, and her B.F.A. in Art and Design from Wuhan University in Wuhan, China. Her early studies focused on Public Art, such as sculpture and installation art, which allows her to design and make jewelry from different perspectives. Her work has been shown in different countries, including United States, Spain, Australia, Portugal and China.

"Storytelling and my use of imagination are huge aspects of my work. This collection is driven from vintage fishing lures which I found at various places. I engage in play to create my pieces in sculptural ways. I crafted a story with each fishing lure to create an intimate relationship and bring jewelry to an art form rather than be focused on the idea of conventional wearability. By giving these objects unique voices, they communicate with people beyond their physical form. My artistic process creates jewelry that evokes a sense of playfulness, joy, and imagination."

xunliustudio.com
@xunliu26

Printer

2020, sterling silver, acrylic sheet mirror, 8” x 9” x 1.5”

Kehan Wan (Yoky)

Kehan Wan earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in jewelry metal art with distinction at California College of the Arts, where she also did an internship with jewelry artist Curtis H. Arima. Her solo senior show, In this era of Anxiety, was exhibited at CCA. Currently, she earned her Master of Fine Arts degree in Metal at the State University of New York at New Paltz, where she worked as recruitment and promotions graduate assistant for a year. Her thesis show, In this Era of Big Data, was exhibited as an online show in SUNY New Paltz. Her works combine objects and jewelry into a maze-like pattern small installation to express the concept of living in the world and being controlled by databases. The combination of fragility and scale of this miniature world she creates gives a sense of being dominated by external power. Inviting the audience to obverse the world from diverse perspectives to explore the world we live in.

"Dependent upon the internet for all aspects of daily life, we are unconsciously being controlled by data mining and have become desensitized to the security concerns of mass data collection. Through micro-installations and wearable works, I create tactile data bits and visualizations that draw attention to these complex issues. Delicate rows of tiny human figures are arranged to read as text, or the constant stream of recorded personal data. Jewelry pieces are arranged into an aerial installation monitored by looming magnifying lenses. These works invite the viewer to have a closer look, and provoke feelings of invaded privacy, surveillance, and information overload."

yoky111124.wixsite.com/metal
@yokywan_metalsmith


Connection

2019, cement, sterling silver, cz stones, 12" x 8" x 4"

Ziqin Min

Ziqin Min is a jewelry designer from China. He studied Metal Smithing MFA at University of Wisconsin Madison. His work primarily focuses on creating sculptural jewelry in wearable forms using metal smiting skill. His inspiration comes from the natural world. Ziqin believes that there is a mutual relationship between human being and natural objects. In fact, human being is a part of the nature. He attempts to communicate to the audience that we should learn to love and pay attention to the objects surrounding us in this world. Thus, flowers, shells, spoondrifts, dragonfly wings and etc become the major inspirations for his work. He concentrates on developed tailored abstract organic shapes and patterns using forging and forming techniques based on these concrete forms He also integrates lines and movements of water stream into his work, as he considers them a representative feature of the natural world.
Ziqin grew up in a small canal town in Shanghai, China, where he started to learn Chinese painting and calligraphy at the age of 10. He inherited a lot of ideologies from his practice on traditional Chinese paintings depicting mountain landscape, human posture, insects and temples. Such paintings always overtone a poetic philosophy, which is also what Ziqin would like to achieve in his projects.

"My work is talking about the relationship among people, property, commercial jewelry and tools. Money is the biggest source of stress for people all over the world. For different culture aspect, mostly of the parents in China save the money to buy property since child born so that give their less financial stress in their future. In other hand, another part of people has to make money by themselves. In the daily life, people are like track in the cement jungle. Property is sign of wealth, and the commercial jewelry got same idea that people show their wealth to the world. Through my artwork, I use cement as material to represent the property. Furthermore, I use precious metal like silver, gold and gems to blend jewelry elements into my art effect object."

minziqin0524.wixsite.com/marsh
@ziqinmin

BoomBapRing 1

2019, resin rapid prototype, cast sterling silver, bluetooth speaker, cubic zirconia, enamel paint, 2" x 2" x 2"

Zach Mellman-Carsey

Zach Mellman-Carsey is a visual artist Living in Lancaster Pennsylvania. Zach received his Master’s degree in Fine art Jewelry and Metalsmithing at Indiana University in Bloomington. Zach’s work explores the use of sound and Bluetooth speakers imbedded into wearable jewelry using computer aided design and digital fabrication.

"Breaking, reformatting, re-contextualizing and discovery are central themes to my studio practice. Creating wearables that inspire not only the maker and wearer, but also the audience is a mark I strive for when crafting objects.

Grey Ghosting is the phenomena of covering graffiti with grey or monotone primer, in the attempt to censor, remove or hide the expression of a graffiti artist. This act is something I feel is exhibited on my own body as the birth mark on my neck, which has a personal significance to my mother’s unexpected passing as I was just becoming a young man. She would kiss that spot on my neck frequently, and the lack of that tactile sensation leaves a physical and mental scar.
My identity is shown in the work through various expressions of abandoned industrial, commercial and residential spaces. The work comes alive when the viewer or wearer is greeted with the surprise of music, moving parts and lights."

zachsaul.art
@zachsaulart

Pink Ooze

2020, glue, pearls, fabric, thread, resin, silver, silver fill, steel, 2.75" x 1.25" x 0.75"

Hattie Eshleman

Hattie Eshleman is an interdisciplinary artist and metalsmith from Lynchburg, Virginia. In 2017 she received her BFA from James Madison University where she was also awarded a portfolio scholarship, a CVPA Research Grant, and the Studio Art Achievement award. After her graduation she taught metalsmithing at Camp Laurel and has exhibited work in New York, D.C., and California. Her work was featured in the first Jewelry and Metals Survey published by the Society of North American Goldsmiths. In addition to having her own studio practice, Hattie also works as a bench jeweler focusing on jewelry restoration, repair, and production.

"As an interdisciplinary artist, I invite the many mediums I work with into conversation with each other. I place high value on play and experimentation, examining both form and concept from the perspective of an explorer, feeling for the edges of things, moving ever outward.
My work plays with the dichotomy between attraction and repulsion, the beautiful and the grotesque. I deal with subject matter that makes most people uncomfortable, but I do so whimsically, expressing existential themes through a lens of humor and playfulness. The work has a raw and poetic beauty. It’s a meditation on the mundane. It's a reminder to ask questions about what it means to be human.
I have been working on a series of experiments using clumps of old glue that could no longer be used. I’m interested in finding alternatives to traditional gemstones, especially if it means making them myself from the detritus of everyday life. These brooches came about because of my love not only for metal and the sculptural potential of The Brooch, but also because of my work as a collage artist. This cross-pollination of mediums, combined with my desire to play and explore creates the perfect environment for innovation."

hattieeshleman.com
@hattie.eshleman


Vaguely Human

2020, glue, resin, pearls, 14k gold, thread, steel, 2.5" x 1.5" x 0.75"

Hattie Eshleman

Hattie Eshleman is an interdisciplinary artist and metalsmith from Lynchburg, Virginia. In 2017 she received her BFA from James Madison University where she was also awarded a portfolio scholarship, a CVPA Research Grant, and the Studio Art Achievement award. After her graduation she taught metalsmithing at Camp Laurel and has exhibited work in New York, D.C., and California. Her work was featured in the first Jewelry and Metals Survey published by the Society of North American Goldsmiths. In addition to having her own studio practice, Hattie also works as a bench jeweler focusing on jewelry restoration, repair, and production.

"As an interdisciplinary artist, I invite the many mediums I work with into conversation with each other. I place high value on play and experimentation, examining both form and concept from the perspective of an explorer, feeling for the edges of things, moving ever outward.
My work plays with the dichotomy between attraction and repulsion, the beautiful and the grotesque. I deal with subject matter that makes most people uncomfortable, but I do so whimsically, expressing existential themes through a lens of humor and playfulness. The work has a raw and poetic beauty. It’s a meditation on the mundane. It's a reminder to ask questions about what it means to be human.
I have been working on a series of experiments using clumps of old glue that could no longer be used. I’m interested in finding alternatives to traditional gemstones, especially if it means making them myself from the detritus of everyday life. These brooches came about because of my love not only for metal and the sculptural potential of The Brooch, but also because of my work as a collage artist. This cross-pollination of mediums, combined with my desire to play and explore creates the perfect environment for innovation."

hattieeshleman.com
@hattie.eshleman





Photo Credit: G. Mark Lewis

Burden

2019, sterling silver, glass, rose, rose stems, paper, 4" x 2.5" x 2.5" (Chain: 23')

John Sullivan

John Sullivan is a young artist currently based out of New York. He received his BFA from Colorado State University in 2015 and is currently enrolled at SUNY New Paltz for graduate school. Prior to graduate school, John was on the board of directors for the Colorado Metalsmithing Association and was an apprentice to artist Ira Sherman. He is the recipient of the 2015 Niche Award for student sculpture and has been featured in numerous publications, exhibitions, and private collections.

"I create work as a means of working through past traumas and coping with major depression. The translation of my inner turmoil into objects of adornment acts as a therapeutic process of expressing that which is often difficult to discuss. Events from my past, such as abusive relationships, abandonment, and sexual assault, have marked pivotal moments in my life that shape who I am today. By creating representations of the internal strife that afflicts my mental health, I am able to find closure and healthy growth. What I am presenting are psychological scars, the remnants of old wounds that will forever be a part of my identity."

johnsullivanmetals.com
@navillusmetalworks

Photo Credit: Matt Gubancsik Photography

Radial styloid fixation #2

2017, ABS plastic, stainless steel, 7 ½” x 4 ½” x 2 ½”

Caitlin Skelcey

Caitlin Skelcey is a traditonally trained jeweler/object maker, creating and teaching in Buffalo, NY. She is assistant professor at SUNY Buffalo State teaching 2D/3D Digital Foundations and oversees the Art & Design Digital Fabrication lab. She earned her MFA in Metals at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign in 2017 and BFAs in both Metals and Jewelry Design and Painting from Kendall College of Art and Design.
Using the body as the site for her work, her practice originates from her own augmented physicality. Through digital and traditional adornment practices, her jewelry prosthetics aim to blur the boundaries of human biology and machine, and act as a catalyst for questioning the nature of the human relationship to the artificial.

"As an object maker, I am interested in cultural subversions of the artificial and natural. Through the fusion of digital fabrication, traditional adornment-craft practices, I consider cultural constructs of bodily identity and how technology creates, redefines, and enhances it within a transhuman world. This work, created for the body, originates from my own augmented physicality, which changed not only my body but also how I find connection and empathize with others. Parallels drawn between contemporary adornment to life-saving and enhancing prosthetics and medical implants, reflecting the literal fusion of body and machine. Using ubiquitous plastic, 3D pens, and implanted hardware, these extruded and fabricated pieces convey a machine made immortality reminiscent of bone forms and medical implantations contorting and mutating natural biology to their will. From these materials and processes, these pieces contort the wearer's physicality with alluring, uncanny forms; tactile ambiguity leads to a morbid sense of uncertainty and conflict. These blurring boundaries of human biology and machine reflect new natures of the cyborg, and the desire to create a whole self."

caitlinskelcey.com
@caskelcey

Photo Credit: Matt Gubancsik Photography

Styloid ligament

2017, ABS plastic, 6 ½” x 4” x 3 ¾”

Caitlin Skelcey

Caitlin Skelcey is a traditonally trained jeweler/object maker, creating and teaching in Buffalo, NY. She is assistant professor at SUNY Buffalo State teaching 2D/3D Digital Foundations and oversees the Art & Design Digital Fabrication lab. She earned her MFA in Metals at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign in 2017 and BFAs in both Metals and Jewelry Design and Painting from Kendall College of Art and Design.
Using the body as the site for her work, her practice originates from her own augmented physicality. Through digital and traditional adornment practices, her jewelry prosthetics aim to blur the boundaries of human biology and machine, and act as a catalyst for questioning the nature of the human relationship to the artificial.

"As an object maker, I am interested in cultural subversions of the artificial and natural. Through the fusion of digital fabrication, traditional adornment-craft practices, I consider cultural constructs of bodily identity and how technology creates, redefines, and enhances it within a transhuman world. This work, created for the body, originates from my own augmented physicality, which changed not only my body but also how I find connection and empathize with others. Parallels drawn between contemporary adornment to life-saving and enhancing prosthetics and medical implants, reflecting the literal fusion of body and machine. Using ubiquitous plastic, 3D pens, and implanted hardware, these extruded and fabricated pieces convey a machine made immortality reminiscent of bone forms and medical implantations contorting and mutating natural biology to their will. From these materials and processes, these pieces contort the wearer's physicality with alluring, uncanny forms; tactile ambiguity leads to a morbid sense of uncertainty and conflict. These blurring boundaries of human biology and machine reflect new natures of the cyborg, and the desire to create a whole self."

caitlinskelcey.com
@caskelcey

Photo Credit: Artistar Jewels_PH Andrea Salpetre

GEL-A-TON

2018, brass, silver, found chain, powdercoat, plastic, 20" x 7" x 0.3"

MANDO BEE

MANDO BEE earned their BFA from Texas State University with a focus in Metals and Jewelry in 2018. They have exhibited their work with Heidi Lowe Gallery, Ombre Gallery, Vancouver Metal Arts Association, Australian Temp/Contemp Gallery, and Milan Jewelry Week. They were included in the Emerging Artist program of New York City Jewelry Week and completed a 3 month residency at the Baltimore Jewelry Center in 2018. MANDO is featured in the Smithsonian Cooper Hewitt Learning Lab highlighting LGBTQIA+ artists, SNAG JaMS, ARTISTAR Jewels, and Accessory Vanity Fair Magazine. They are currently an MFA candidate at SUNY New Paltz.

"As a nonbinary individual, they strive to create work that unapologetically challenges the role of contemporary jewelry culture, and its impact and influence on the perception of gender and class. Their adornments are lush with complex fabrication and avant-garde materials that create a maximalist aesthetic that can't be ignored. Color is a focal point, often in bright, bold and neon palettes that reference candy wrappers, lottery tickets, and other discarded items they find on the streets. Their wearables are a physical manifestation of a self-made reality that processes trauma, life experiences, and their gender identity. The hours of sawing and riveting by hand that is necessary to create their work is a physical ritual that brings them closer to the source of their inspiration and aesthetic goals."

mandobee.cloud
@sparkle_filth

Arnica Salve

2019, vitreous enamel, graphite, copper, brass, 4.5" x 4.5" x 1"

Carolina S Reyes

Carolina Sephra Reyes graduated from East Carolina University, May of 2019. Her work and research continue along the lines of Herbalism, using herbs as medicine, and using her work as teaching points for herself and her audience. She now lives in her hometown of San Miguel, New Mexico, focusing on the native plants found in her area, cultivating a medicinal herbal garden in her yard and in her studio practice.

"The practice of using herbs and plants as remedies had, for many years, been the most accessible, most effective form of medicine in cultures around the world. With the development of contemporary, or Western medicine, much of the cultural knowledge of using herbalism has been lost. My research focuses on bringing these ancient practices, recipes, and uses back into the present, using metalsmithing as a transitional teaching point in that narrative. At the same time, I challenge the traditional metalsmithing processes; breaking the 'frame' usually seen in champlevé enameling, and steering clear of the consistency of an electric kiln, choosing instead to give the naked flame of a torch a chance to alter and add to the surface treatment of enamel. Through trial and error, practical and theoretical research, and endless curiosity, my work uses knowledge from the fields of metals and botanical studies to tie past and present together, always looking towards the enhancement of both fields."


@csr12

Sun Hoops

2020, 3D printed PLA, brass, sterling silver ear wire, 2.5" x 3" x 0.5"

Connor Remboldt

Based out of North East Kansas Connor enjoys the outdoors and uses his explorations in the world to inform his work. Handicrafts, small objects, and technology have always found a way to work into his life, emerging from custom or nit-picky additions to already existing items such as legos or other personalized items. Inspiration from DIY forums on the internet, skilled hobbyists, as well as works of recognized artists from contemporary and modern crafts collide into Connor's work that can seem to jump gaps aesthetically and thematically.

"Digitally conceived, mechanically processed, and traditionally fabricated, my work bridges gaps between traditional metalsmithing and the ‘material smiths’ of the future by application of 3D printed parts to precious metal fabrication. 3D printers are becoming more and more common place, with the accessibility of cheaper products and software. My prints are from an FDM (Fused Deposition Modelling) 3D printer, and is only a snapshot into the current technology of today. I have used the accessibility of my own machine to rapid prototype designs and keep all work done in-house, with the understanding that there are a variety of finer detailed services available. I have chosen this method to mitigate lags in the design/build process and also to garner acceptance of machines that can’t create ‘perfect’ prints. By combining this printing style with my own handicraft abilities, I am tying myself to the narrative of other emerging artists creating work with new technology, yet limited available resources from a physical studio or otherwise."

remboldtstudio.com
@connorrem

Photo Credit: Yunchen Chen

Curve II

2019, garlic peel, sterling silver, copper, agate, lapis, stainless steel (pin), 7" x 7" x 7"

Miao He

Miao He was born and raised in Beijing, China. Since 2015, she has been studying in the graduate jewelry program at the Savannah College of Art & Design in Georgia, USA. She was major in product design at the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology from 2009 to 2013.

"Decay is part of the journey toward the end of life for all organic matter and is a well-known rule in the world. The meaning of decay is negative and often related with death. People think decay is ugly. In my work, decay is beauty in a special perspective as if it is a sign of potential of growing a new life in the process of decline. Through the body of work, I try to explain the vitality behind the original decay in existence. The material that everyone throws away becomes a piece of precious jewelry, the fragility translated into hard metallic substance and the death reversed into new life. When the garlic peel turns to a brooch, a ring or a pair of earrings, it is no longer useless but becomes the entity of value. Each of the components of garlic peel is growing in their way. Everyone sees decay pass by time and might feel sad that no way to stop it. However, we can absorb the negative emotion, and translate in the paradoxes in life that reviewed as beauty of decay."

miaohejewelry.com
@miaohejewelry

Photo Credit: Yunchen Chen

Curve

2019, garlic peel, sterling silver, copper, agate, stainless steel (pin), 2.8" x 5.3" x 2.6"

Miao He

Miao He was born and raised in Beijing, China. Since 2015, she has been studying in the graduate jewelry program at the Savannah College of Art & Design in Georgia, USA. She was major in product design at the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology from 2009 to 2013.

"Decay is part of the journey toward the end of life for all organic matter and is a well-known rule in the world. The meaning of decay is negative and often related with death. People think decay is ugly. In my work, decay is beauty in a special perspective as if it is a sign of potential of growing a new life in the process of decline. Through the body of work, I try to explain the vitality behind the original decay in existence. The material that everyone throws away becomes a piece of precious jewelry, the fragility translated into hard metallic substance and the death reversed into new life. When the garlic peel turns to a brooch, a ring or a pair of earrings, it is no longer useless but becomes the entity of value. Each of the components of garlic peel is growing in their way. Everyone sees decay pass by time and might feel sad that no way to stop it. However, we can absorb the negative emotion, and translate in the paradoxes in life that reviewed as beauty of decay."

miaohejewelry.com
@miaohejewelry




Photo Credit: Jason Ju & Fei Gao

Memento

2020, copper, 35 x 45 x 55 cm

Fei Gao

Fei Gao is a New York based jewelry artist. She was born and raised in Hangzhou during a period of intense urban expansion in China. Her work is inspired by these rapid changes in her hometown and the passage of time. Fei has exhibited her work in “Anonymous Brooklyn” during NYCJW 2019, and she won second prize at the Pratt Junior Jewelry Awards, sponsored by Rio Grande.

“In my collection MEMENTO, I explore the unique culture, atmosphere, and lifestyle in China at the end of the last century. These deeply ingrained memories of neon light in a dark night, a trolley passing through the city, sprawling innumerable bamboo scaffolds, the elderly walking with a birdcage, as well as the typical fire escape staircases in old buildings, have faded away in reality, but not in my vision.
The central piece of MEMENTO is a shoulder piece of scaffolding that other pieces in the collection can connect to. This combination of scaffolding, accent lighting, installation, and smaller jewelry pieces transport the wearer into an idealized version of the city from my youth. Every piece is not only a wearable adornment in its own right, but also a part of the ‘city’. Each conveys a fragment of unforgettable memories.
Working mainly in metal, I like the flexibility of silver and copper. They can be represented as soft as bamboo or hard as rebar. I love the colors and the glossy texture of enamel, and have combined it with metal for this collection, adding LED lights to bring these streetscapes of my youth to life.”

fgao2.com
@2fgao2


Building Your Personal Barcode

2020, sterling silver, fine silver, stainless steel, magnets, 3" x 3" x 2.8"

Xiaowei Hua

Xiaowei Hua was born in Nanjing, China. She moved to New York, United States to study. She graduated from Pratt Institute with a B.F.A. degree in Jewelry Design in 2020. Her style is inspired by minimalism and contemporary fine jewelry, paintings and illustrations. She is currently focusing on the conflict between identity and societal standard and seeking to explore the relationship between wearers and artist by creating jewelry with interactions with wearers.

"My jewelry always comments on today’s artworks and surroundings according to my observations. The latest jewelry reflects how social expectations and peer pressure can force us into unnecessary self-evaluation. The jewelry pieces deal with identity under the pressure and expectation of current society. I am seeking to explore the relationship between wearers and artist by creating jewelry with innovative interactions with wearers."

hua-xiaowei.com
@xw_hua


Mask of Justice Goddess---mask

2020, feather, resin, brass, 15" x 11" x 7.5"

Xuewen Yao

Xuewen Yao, an artist living in Shanghai, always using jewelry and installation as the medium to express. After graduating from Sheffield Hallam University in the United Kingdom, Yao has always insisted on exploring the integration of different disciplines in the contemporary art context. Her works are mostly based on the thinking of economic, medical, judicial fields. She is good at using non-traditional materials poetically to reflect the contradictions and dislocations existing in the real society. Yao firmly believes that no matter what discipline, its highest value is to leave traces on people, such as kindness, integrity, dignity and the desire for peace.

"Being moved by the poetic justice, I use design to study the existence of justice and its value in reality. This is the origin of my collection. If functional law cannot evoke our sense of identity, then what does justice rely on to demonstrate its power? The conflict between justice and freedom is especially obvious in modern society. Any judicial case involving rights and morality can lead to public inappropriate comments or physical conflicts. Unrational groups will move towards democratic tyranny.
I always sit on a park bench, watching birds eating breadcrumb, or looking up to watch them flying in the sky. Their wings look gorgeous in the sunshine. It is feathers that give them the ability to fly freely. And I sometimes meet another scene, mud and blood covered wings, leaving broken and crushed feathers. It's a sign of death, the other extreme of freedom. What will happen to democracy out of control? The white feather texture looks beautiful and holy, but it is also easily broken and polluted. I cut the white feathers and seal them into the resin. Translucent resin is hazy, creating a peaceful world in which feathers representing freedom are imprisoned, and any anxiety, anger, corruption are forbidden. The metal variant seeds hidden in jewellery objects contain both the richness and darkness of life. All the seeds look quiet, waiting for a moment or someone to come and arouse them from deep sleep.
If the Goddess of Justice is not blindfolded, will her judgement still fair? If Adam and Eve didn't eat the apple of Eden, would you want it? And where is the boundary between justice and freedom?"



Apple from Eden---necklace

2020, feather, resin, brass, 5.5" x 4.5" x 5.5"

Xuewen Yao

Xuewen Yao, an artist living in Shanghai, always using jewelry and installation as the medium to express. After graduating from Sheffield Hallam University in the United Kingdom, Yao has always insisted on exploring the integration of different disciplines in the contemporary art context. Her works are mostly based on the thinking of economic, medical, judicial fields. She is good at using non-traditional materials poetically to reflect the contradictions and dislocations existing in the real society. Yao firmly believes that no matter what discipline, its highest value is to leave traces on people, such as kindness, integrity, dignity and the desire for peace.

"Being moved by the poetic justice, I use design to study the existence of justice and its value in reality. This is the origin of my collection. If functional law cannot evoke our sense of identity, then what does justice rely on to demonstrate its power? The conflict between justice and freedom is especially obvious in modern society. Any judicial case involving rights and morality can lead to public inappropriate comments or physical conflicts. Unrational groups will move towards democratic tyranny.
I always sit on a park bench, watching birds eating breadcrumb, or looking up to watch them flying in the sky. Their wings look gorgeous in the sunshine. It is feathers that give them the ability to fly freely. And I sometimes meet another scene, mud and blood covered wings, leaving broken and crushed feathers. It's a sign of death, the other extreme of freedom. What will happen to democracy out of control? The white feather texture looks beautiful and holy, but it is also easily broken and polluted. I cut the white feathers and seal them into the resin. Translucent resin is hazy, creating a peaceful world in which feathers representing freedom are imprisoned, and any anxiety, anger, corruption are forbidden. The metal variant seeds hidden in jewellery objects contain both the richness and darkness of life. All the seeds look quiet, waiting for a moment or someone to come and arouse them from deep sleep.
If the Goddess of Justice is not blindfolded, will her judgement still fair? If Adam and Eve didn't eat the apple of Eden, would you want it? And where is the boundary between justice and freedom?"


Newfangled

“Now, the present moment; a time that has not past. We are artists of today, tomorrow, and the infinite future.  We define the doings of today that will be looked back upon as innovative, advanced, and progressive. Newfangled is an exhibition featuring emerging artists who have learned to break the rules to enhance the handcrafted wearable art of today.”


Click on each blind box to unveil the work; click again to see the artist’s information!